Wednesday, 19 August 2009

it comes from where!!!

A chance conversation at work has made me realise just how little the next generation know about textiles. After explaining that I was knitting some handspun yarn (practising knitting squares) and that the little fluffy bits were sheeps curls, we went on to talk about silk and where it came from.
Yesterday I even took some silk and silk cocoons into work to help explain. It seems to me that a gap is developing in basic knowledge and it is supported by the number of people who seem to think I am weaving when they spot me relaxing with my drop spindle. This is making me even more determined to be seen making lace, stitching or spinning in public, am I alone in feeling like this? surely not!

Now....stitching photo of a keyring.

keyring

Off to get things ready for stitched up tonight.

14 comments:

Murgelchen94 said...

Oh, no your not alone. I think so.

LG,
Helga

Frances Arnold said...

Our local Third grade classes read the story "The Keeping Quilt" each autumn and myself and other members from my guild go into the school and talk to the kids about quilting. It is so much fun to see their eyes light up when they see the beautiful patterns and colors in the quilts. One boy went home and told his mother that he would take over all of the mending now because he knew how to sew!!! Keep on spreading the news!!!

peahen said...

Ditto! I think knitting or spinning in public is great. Well done on the evangelistic work! I've spent one lunchtime at work showing a friend how to spin, and I'm thinking of making it a regular 'drop in'. I do agree that we have a generation that have lost connection with the production of food as well as textiles. However, craft centres are as popular as ever and with the growth of the net, blogs, flickr, etsy etc, perhaps traditional crafts are becoming more popular again.

Woolly Bits said...

I agree - it feels like when the kid is asked where the milk comes from and says: it comes in tetrapacks from the supermarket:(( keep working at it - you're not alone!

Ruth said...

I agree - the majority of people are clueless. When I am hand needle felting in public, people ask if it is a voodoo doll =0). I always want to say "Yes" stab the doll in the leg and say "Doesn't your leg hurt?"

Karine said...

Yes, we are clueless. That's why we need people like you! (I am not sure I can be included in the "younger" generation, however.)

Chris Gray Textile Art said...

..they stopped doing "Textiles" at our local school because "they couldn't thread a needle without hurting themselves"!....

So HOW do they LEARN?!!

It is an alien concept to sew on a button - just get a new shirt....

When I sat at the back of a student's lesson making a jacket for the school musical production, I was amazed at the reaction to my pincushion...the number of teenagers who'd NEVER seen one before!

...and you're absolutely right...they don't know what's weaving, spinning, quilting or anything.....

..don't know what'll happen if we stop trading with eastern europe or the far east.....

no more cheap disposable clothes...

(Sorry!...that's my moan for the monthe over now!)

Laura Neal said...

I get asked so many questions when I start knitting away in public. My favorite was the uninformed man who told me it was too hot to wear wool in Houston. This is a pet peeve of mine...I explained that acrylic doesn't breathe and as a person sweats, it collects water. While wool breathes and will remain warm even when wet. It just gets me that people are so uninformed, ahem idiots! Most of the kids today do not know how to make anything, they think buy, buy, buy is the answer! Most of them do not know how to make something by hand. Sad but, true.

Pam said...

When I taught year 7,because of a lot of behavioral issues, we had a discussion about what "pushes buttons" in our lives.Grabbed this opportunity to have a 'learn how to sew on a button'tutorial. Warmed the cockles of my heart to see the boys having a go. No excuses, I told them after that.I don't think a lot of the class had ever held a needle before.To give them credit, I think a lot of young people would love to dabble in more craft activities, but are not given much opportunity - so grab a chance at educating the masses whenever you can!(Not just craft either - I knew of a little indigenous australian boy who thought anyone, including kids, could get as much money as they wanted just by going to "a machine thing in the wall - Mum does!!".

Wanda said...

The keyfob is awesome. I don't think the gap ends with textiles. Or starts with it. There seems to be a worldwide problem with the kids these days. It's vacation time here and the weather has been flawless...where are the kids??? Not one single kid is out playing in my neighborhood. Ever!!! No groups of little boys on their bikes, no "gaggle" of little girls walking through the park, talking about things that are important to little girls. No teams playing on the soccer field. No "to and from" the house of their best friend. I have no one to give my "family hierlooms" to....the kids just ask..."how much is it worth". It makes me sad. I had such a wonderful childhood. We were sent outside to "burn off energy". We were always playing..and I don't mean organized sports. I mean playing by using our imagination. Maybe imagination doesn't fit into the future. I'm glad I am my age and not a kid in today's world.

Sally H said...

The keyfob is great! You would be proud of me... There was a lace exhibition at Penrhyn Castle which I took Meg and Steve to. Meg had a little go at some lace, very well explained by a lovely lady there.

Guzzisue said...

Thanks for all of your comments, I suspect this is a debate that is going to rumble on for a while.

LOVE STITCHING RED said...

I find people are either totally into textiles as much as me or are totally ignorant of all the textile techniques and background and never the twain shall meet ...

Love your embroidered keyring btw

Lady Euphoria Deathwatch said...

Hi Guzzisue,

That is the reason I started doing demonstrations so many years ago. Someone needs to educate the next generation. And there are to few left who are in the know.

Hugs, Euphoria